Inktober Is Coming

Inktober is an artist challenge dreamed up by illustrator Jakes Parker. Its original purpose was to improve his personal inking skills. But the challenge has been taken on by others. It's an excellent scribal experiment and personal challenge. A way you can play with new scripts, different papers, unique inks.

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My New Thing

I got a new camera. I’m over-the-moon excited. I’ll be able to take awesome, crisp friends and family pictures, fur-baby portraits and dreamy hued travel shots. You’ll see better blog photos too. A&S projects, events, garb, scenery, and action fighting pics. The possibilities are endless. Right now I have no idea what all its buttons are or what the dials […]

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The ‘Craft’ Of Writing SCA Documentation

Entries Showing Documentation The Barony of the Lonely Tower will be having their Arts and Sciences Championship competition this coming February. In this competition, the current champion sets the challenge for those interested in earning the honor. This year, Honorable Lady Cristina la Ambeler challenged each entrant to submit two entries for judging -something you excel at, and another of something you […]

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Internet Round Up 5

Again my internet surfing snared websites too good to keep from you. These turn up as I sleuth out information for blog posts. I’ve been saving them to post in one place. These popped up relating to life-long e-learning. And learning  about Medieval history, its people and its things are what we do in the SCA. The Medieval History section of Thought Company. This is a life-long learning website with 20 years creating educational content. Each section has its own ‘guide’ editor highlighting interesting topics and commentary articles. There’s a helpful Section Guide with their interests and an email newsletter for you to keep learning something daily. Khan Academy is a non-profit organization offering you personalized learning videos and an individualized dashboard so you can study at your own pace. Its intriguing Introduction to the Middle Ages is a perfect starting place for Medieval private study.  Academia.edu is for more scholarly research. It a way academics share research papers with masses of people for free. The company’s mission is to accelerate the world’s research. But it also allows them to monitor analytics impacting their research, and tracking the research they follow. Academia.edu is widely read attracting over 37 million visitors a month. Related Prior Post: Internet Round-Up 1, 2, 3, and 4.

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How-to Educate Yourself In Scribal Skills? Learning And Teaching Them

At Lonely Tower’s scribes gathering recently Ly. Kristin asked what the basic illumination skills were that she should learn. Kristin is an accomplished preprint painter with wonderful skills, but she wants to take it a step further. How does she know what skills she should learn? Where would you look? A great starting place is this archived article “A Guide For The […]

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Nobody Told Me…

My binder-portfolio with the early stuff I made. Nobody tells this to you who are beginners. Beginners in any creative craft. I wish someone told me.  If you do creative work, you get into it because you have good taste built within you. But there’s a gap between starting to create and being good.  it’s the just not that good […]

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Tip To Seeing Like An Artist

See the details? Have you been asking yourself when painting a preprint or charter why experienced scribes put the shadows where they do? Why the whitework goes where it does? Or how you transform what you see to the page? Here’s an idea for you to try. Before the huge number of illuminations on the internet, I would hunt down books that had enlarged the small pictures of illuminations. Today it’s easy to do the same thing yourself with online images.  Find a high-resolution digital illumination picture you like and zoom-in. Enlarge and expand them dramatically. Save them or print them out. Then take your time and study their strokes and details. Try to recreate them.  On Pinterest, I have a few boards that may help you with this.  Illumination: Drapery  Illumination: Shading Illumination: Strokes Illumination: Whitework I have confidence you’ll figure things out. The more illuminations you peruse and pore over the strokes the easier it becomes. It’s all about you recreating tiny details. Related Prior Post:   5 Tips To Train Your Artist Eye Related External Page:  Advanced Illumination by Mistress Nerissa de Saye 

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Each Scroll’s An Experiment

A Hair-raising Learning Experience From the recent scrolls I’ve done, I decided each scroll’s an experiment. It’s an options’ string from its inception to beyond the scroll’s completion. A learning experience all the way.  When you receive the text you choose from the different calligraphy scripts and illumination styles. Once you pick the inspirational manuscripts suited to the recipient’s persona you select […]

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6 Reasons to Learn Calligraphy

I read recently that learning calligraphy refines one’s temperament. Well, mine certainly needs refining. But why should you learn calligraphy besides you feel it in your “bones” you want to do it? These are a few reasons I have. Calligraphy is not expensive to learn. It’s a silly reason if it’s your only one. It’s an important factor if you already are […]

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The Beginning And The Evolving Scribe

“Is what I’m doing good enough to be accepted?” I hear this question often. Sometimes more than once from the same person. I’ve even asked it about my own work.   It is one reason some scribes stick to AoA or baronial level scrolls. The scrolls are needed, but they’re also less intimidating because the designs are usually done by […]

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10 Top Calligraphy And Illumination Artists

Have you thought about becoming a C and I artist? I have. Calligraphy and illumination arts aren’t dusty ancient skills Medieval monks used to make religious tomes. They are used by many today to create art.  Here are ten people who modernly use calligraphy and illumination to create art and make a living. People who prove it is possible to do something you love and be paid for it.  Marie Angel was a calligrapher, illuminator and book illustrator. My first how-to book was her Painting For Calligraphers, although she has others. Check out this Pinterest board of her work. Randy Asplund recreates medieval books and illustrates science fiction and fantasy books. In the SCA he is known as Sir RanthulfR AsparlundR.  Kathryn Finter studies and reproduces 15th-century panel and illuminated works from the National Gallery of Canada and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Nancy Hulan sells her award winning book arts at Renaissance Faires and her Etsy shop. Her work inspires me and give me courage to expand my interests. Donald Jackson‘s modern handwritten St. John’s Bible team project. Jackson has authored several related books. Patricia Lovett creates, teaches and lectures on subjects and topics related to calligraphy and manuscripts. She has several related books. Marie Lynskey is an English traditional scribe, heraldic artist, and author. Her excellent book, Illumination For Calligraphers, was the second how-to book I bought.  Timothy Noad is an English calligrapher, illuminator, heraldic artist and author. Although he’s written several books, I particularly like his Illuminated Alphabet how-to-book. Illumination […]

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Is Handwriting Doomed?

With digital devices’ development and pervasiveness, educators have long promoted ending handwriting instruction. Something I cannot fathom or condone. Handwriting is not an archaic communication tool to be scrapped for modern keyboarding. Handwriting’s motions creating letters, words and sentences stimulate the brain in a way typing does not. According to Psychology Today’s Dr. William Klemm, Ph.D., learning handwriting successfully develops controlled visual tracking and high-speed neural responses to the corrective visual feedback loop. (That’s a mouthful.) He predicts: In short, learning cursive should train the brain to function more effectively in visual scanning. Theoretically, reading efficiency could benefit. I predict that new research would show that learning cursive will improve reading speed and will train the brain to have better hand-eye coordination. While computers and TV can be educational, Klemm also reports in another article, when letters are not made by your own hand memory-creation lessens. (And I found more; check out this blog, or NPR’s comments.) As a scribe, a calligrapher and illuminator, I predict more people will seek us out to do what they didn’t learn, to write. I’ve already been asked to do this for simple Christmas gift tags, but that was for beauty’s sake. What about skill and ability? I’m concerned the troubles my grandkids may experience. Ben may have difficulty learning caused by digital devices and short-forms used in schools. Charlotte’s artistic creativity may be dampened. They are both so wonderful at what they do either would be tragic. Not writing […]

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