Inktober Is Coming

You may be asking “What is Inktober”? It’s sort of a weird name, right? Something cobbled together from “Ink” and “October”. And you’re right. But it’s more. “Inktober” is an artist challenge dreamed up by illustrator Jakes Parker. Its original purpose was to improve his personal inking skills. But the challenge has been taken on by others. Inktober’s primary rule was drawing something in ink everyday for a month. Easy right? The website encourages you to take pictures and post them. My goal is to just do it. Because – as in my SCA motto Gloria in Facto – there is Justice In The Doing. You can use any kind of ink. Dip pen, micron pen, cartridge pen. As an SCA scribe you might choose a quill or bamboo. You can use any inks you want commercial or self-produced, modern or medieval. You can do this in a sketchbook or on single pages. You could also use Inktober to practice your calligraphy for a month. Each day a different phrase. Each day a different script. Each day a different pangram. The fun is your efforts don’t have to be perfect or extensive. It’s up to you to determine what qualifies as answering the challenge each day. You’re the only one that will know or judge your effort. Parker’s intent was to improve his illustration sketching skills. But I see it as an excellent scribal experiment and personal challenge. To play […]

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How Do You Write Haiku?

I’m taking a non-SCA class. One assignment was to write a  haiku. I thought “great – Haiku are probably period”. Well I had a few things to learn. You may already know they’re a three-line poem with lines having five, seven, and five syllables each, in that order. Now haiku didn’t begin that way. They started as a something called […]

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Easy Does It SCA Scroll Creation From 2018

Last year about this time I gathered together my prior posts I’d written about scroll creation. The post was Easy Does It: SCA Scroll Creation. Though I didn’t plan it, the posted links round-up made a scroll creation how-to table of contents. And it’s been a very popular blog post.   Since then I’ve added more, In case you missed any, you can see them below.  Beginning SCA AoA Award Painting   Tracing Uses Illuminated Diapering   Guide To Blank Border Scroll Creation The Secrets Of Black And White Gouache  Testing – Which Gouache Brand Rewets Best?   Why Are Vellum And Parchment So Expensive?   Secrets Of Artist Brush Repair Tips To Preventing Rusty Dip Pen Nibs   How To Sharpen Your Broad-Edge Calligraphy Nib  Tips To Drawing More Period People The Best Beginner’s Paint Making Post   Tips And Tricks To Making A Neat Scroll   Tips For Saving Money As An SCA Scribe  Between last year’s list and this one, there’s a lot to take in. Please realize my offerings are not the only way you can do things. Create your art with your style and skill while striving to make it appear as a long lost page from a medieval illuminated manuscript. And take joy in what you create.   Related Prior Post: Easy Does It: SCA Scroll Creation Post Round-Up

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The ‘Craft’ Of Writing SCA Documentation

Entries Showing Documentation The Barony of the Lonely Tower will be having their Arts and Sciences Championship competition this coming February. In this competition, the current champion sets the challenge for those interested in earning the honor. This year, Honorable Lady Cristina la Ambeler challenged each entrant to submit two entries for judging -something you excel at, and another of something you […]

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People Of Color In SCA Award Scrolls

With western art books and resources being mostly produced by white people they tend to assume the white European as a human standard. And in Western European illuminated manuscripts there is a dearth of people of color. But they do exist. And all ethnicities are welcomed into the SCA.  Dijon – BM – ms._0562 f. 181Vcreated around 1260-1270 representing the Holy Land So how do you create an award scroll for a non-White friend with people that look like them? Or maybe your scroll recipient has assumed a Saracen persona. How do you create a scroll creating accurate historic art combat scenes? You seek out original works. There are a few Western European illuminated manuscript pages including people of color. But they may be inappropriate to use such as this one portraying people in the Holy Land created in the late 13th century.  Some 13th -15th century popular French illuminated manuscripts feature Christian-Muslim interaction pictures such as the British Library’s Histoire d’Outremer. And various copies of the Grandes Chroniques de France and the Roman d’Alexandre en Prose. But the best place to search is the website MedievalPOC. It is a blog showcasing European works of art featuring people of color from the fall of the Roman Empire until about 1650. Often these works go unseen elsewhere and you might see them differently now viewing them from a fresh perspective. The blog is searchable and even gives you a guide to its use. If you search digitized manuscripts you’ll see the […]

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How-to Get Your SCA Recreations Noticed

Calontir’s Queens Prize just happened a month ago, September 15th. You may have seen pictures on FaceBook about it. Sadly I wasn’t able to go, but I had many friends that attended. Some were novices who didn’t enter. Why? Many people make authentic medieval items but lament writing documentation. Are you like them? You make something from start to finish […]

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Scroll Finishing Touches

Deadline Made – Court Presentation So you finished a scroll, and you’re pleased. You’re also glad. Glad you didn’t have to start completely over. Glad you made it with time to spare before the presentation deadline. But is that all to finishing a gorgeous scroll? What about finishing touches? Getting the finishing touches right can elevate a scroll to something special […]

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Tracing Uses

Tracing is not cheating. Well, it is if you are passing something off as your own work. But meticulously copying a medieval manuscript you admire is excellent practice. It works well for copying illumination motifs and is a period practice.  This image of the manual is from the Public Domain Review Tracing is even better for calligraphy. It helps you learn the best tools and strokes to use to achieve a manuscript’s same result. It’s also a good exercise warming up your hand-eye-brain connection before a lettering session. To better understand your favorite manuscript’s letter formation select a page with mostly script. Download and print all or part of it in a size that suits your premium printer paper and nib sizes. (Any printer paper less than premium bleeds ink for sure.) Adjust the page size and density through your photo editor. Select your nib size to approximate the printout. Then go over the letters your print out. If you go to the British Library’s Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts advanced search on the right there is a box where you can enter a script’s name. Their terms are rather specific so you might have to try more than once with different script names. Or select a manuscript by location and era. You might also practice letters from this 1510  pattern book from Swabia, Germany made by Gregorius Bock that I’ve pictured. Once you have your printed page you can trace the script and form the letters like […]

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How-to Write An SCA Award Recommendation

Recognition in Court Do you know someone worthy of an SCA award? Someone who deserves recognition for their outstanding medieval recreations or plentiful service? If you do you can help them out by writing an award recommendation.  Yes, you can do this. Anyone can submit one. In Calontir the easiest way to do this is by the Online Award Recommendation Form. Much simpler […]

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