How Do You Write Haiku?

I’m taking a non-SCA class. One assignment was to write a  haiku. I thought “great – Haiku are probably period”. Well I had a few things to learn. You may already know they’re a three-line poem with lines having five, seven, and five syllables each, in that order. Now haiku didn’t begin that way. They started as a something called […]

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How-to Write An SCA Award Recommendation

Recognition in Court Do you know someone worthy of an SCA award? Someone who deserves recognition for their outstanding medieval recreations or plentiful service? If you do you can help them out by writing an award recommendation.  Yes, you can do this. Anyone can submit one. In Calontir the easiest way to do this is by the Online Award Recommendation Form. Much simpler […]

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SCA Award Texts

Scribe lettering. Recently I was asked to create text for an award scroll. It’s something I like doing and use to do often. The common awards are based on period charters and patents of arms. The period inspirations are not actual awards but often legal documents giving land or other rights. They sound very lawyerly because they were legal documents then. […]

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SCA Blogging

Your SCA experiences, the history you learn and the items you re-create are what the Society for Creative Anachronism is all about. If you are like me and want to share these with others you might want to blog about it, too. Since I enjoyed writing class handouts and competition documentation I thought blogging would be easy. But there’s a difference.  Your […]

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Guest Post Blogging

Just before M. Aidan left to teach at this year’s Known World Heraldic and Scribal Symposium I asked her if she would guest post on my blog after she returned. She said she was pleased to do it, but would I do the same for her. Of course, I said.  M. Aidan speaking at Calontir’s 2017 Kingdom Arts and Sciences […]

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Bang-up Book "On Writing Well"

I’m reading this book on writing well. It’s a guide to writing nonfiction. And that’s almost its title. I’ve written so many SCA handouts and competition documentations I forgot writing nonfiction was fun.  William Zinsser’s book, while on writing basics, is amusing and shrewd. I’ve changed my style because of it.   I’m throwing out adverbs (when I recognize them) and abridging things. I’m rewriting earlier posts for practice. It’s fun seeing the flow and feeling become graceful. Although my dogs think I’m crazy, I say out loud everything I write before I push the publish button. A journalist and teacher, Zinsser sometimes breaks rules. Like his thoughts on contractions,  Your style will be warmer and truer to your personality if you use contractions like “I’ll” and “won’t” and “can’t” when they fit comfortably into your writing…There’s no rule against such informality–trust your ear and instincts. And the on valued untouchable initial word “but” he writes, Many of us were taught that no sentence should begin with ‘but.’ If that is what you learned, unlearn it–there’s no stronger word at the start. It announces total contrast with what has gone before, and the reader is therefore primed for the change. I relish the humor he spreads on each page. Like when he describes the difference between “that” and “which”. Anybody who tries to explain “that” and “which” in less than an hour is asking for trouble.  Or his comment about […]

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