Calontir Hath Bloggers

Calontir’s bloggers are a busy bunch presenting you research, opinions, projects, reenactment tales and history. They also come and go over time. Since I switched from Blogger to Word Press I’ve located even more that may interest you. Here are those I’ve found although the list probably isn’t complete. As before these are personal noncommercial Calontiri bloggers who post SCA relevant information at least quarterly. The Falcon Banner, edited by M. Mathurin Kerbusso, is unique as it is a Calontir newsletter. While not an official publication of the SCA or the Kingdom of Calontir, it presents timely information relating to both. The Falcon Banner is always my regular must read. http://falconbanner.gladiusinfractus.com Casks and Quivers is a research information blog written by HL Eynon Llangenydd. On it the author’s full SCA name is a mystery. I found his last name by looking at his listed awards then going to the Calontir OP>Awards>Boga Hirth. And bingo there you see he was its 47th recipient. On Casks and Quivers Eynon gives you details on archery, brewing, naval history and of course his SCA projects. He up most posts with related resources he’s found. Eynon’s name maybe a bit hidden but his information is well detailed. https://www.socpsy.com/casks/ Foxeholly is the SCA blog of HL Ki no Kotori where she writes about Japanese poetry and persona things. Especially her 10th century (Heian Era) Japanese courtier persona. She’s been involved with the SCA since 1991, beginning […]

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The 7 Most Popular Calontir Photo Posts of 2017

Although you are interested in history, don’t you still love photos? Especially photos of events? Through the year I spent days enjoying and photographing Calontir’s events. Its sights and adventures. These 2017 popular photo posts share those memories. M. Nesscia at 12th Night Photos from Lonely Tower’s 12th Night 2017 posted Sunday, January 8, 2017   Kingdom of Calontir’s Arts and Sciences Competitions 2017 posted […]

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10 Top Calligraphy And Illumination Artists

Have you thought about becoming a C and I artist? I have. Calligraphy and illumination arts aren’t dusty ancient skills Medieval monks used to make religious tomes. They are used by many today to create art.  Here are ten people who modernly use calligraphy and illumination to create art and make a living. People who prove it is possible to do something you love and be paid for it.  Marie Angel was a calligrapher, illuminator and book illustrator. My first how-to book was her Painting For Calligraphers, although she has others. Check out this Pinterest board of her work. Randy Asplund recreates medieval books and illustrates science fiction and fantasy books. In the SCA he is known as Sir RanthulfR AsparlundR.  Kathryn Finter studies and reproduces 15th-century panel and illuminated works from the National Gallery of Canada and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Nancy Hulan sells her award winning book arts at Renaissance Faires and her Etsy shop. Her work inspires me and give me courage to expand my interests. Donald Jackson‘s modern handwritten St. John’s Bible team project. Jackson has authored several related books. Patricia Lovett creates, teaches and lectures on subjects and topics related to calligraphy and manuscripts. She has several related books. Marie Lynskey is an English traditional scribe, heraldic artist, and author. Her excellent book, Illumination For Calligraphers, was the second how-to book I bought.  Timothy Noad is an English calligrapher, illuminator, heraldic artist and author. Although he’s written several books, I particularly like his Illuminated Alphabet how-to-book. Illumination […]

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My 10 Favorite European Illuminated Manuscript Inspirations

For your viewing pleasure, I give you my 10 most artistically inspiring illuminated manuscripts. Not all are lavish, but all encourage my creativity. I hope they do yours too.  Book of Kells created c. 800, is a calligraphy masterwork and pinnacle of Insular illumination. Regarded as Ireland’s finest national treasure, its extravagance and decoration complexity combines traditional Christian motifs with ornate swirling patterns. Humans, animals […]

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My 10 Favorite Scribal Materials and Tools

I’ve been a scribe way over 20 years and along the way I have collected materials and tools. Some end up in a bin never to see the light of day again. Other’s become as necessary to me as water.  Here’s my 10 favorite scribal materials and tools, except for paint and paper towels. Things I can’t do without when I create an original scroll.  Ames Lettering Guide— This helps me draw goofproof calligraphy guide-lines with consistent line spacing. I’m also able to have the letter height different from the space between lines. It’s well worth learning how it works. Brause Calligraphy Nib—  I like these stiffer nibs because I still have a heavy hand. Their top reservoir and keen edge help me make clear, sharp letters. Calligrapher’s Bible by David Harris or another letter example.– I like this book because it lays flat and is a smaller size. I sometimes use my own hand-lettered examples that I’ve done on 3″ x 5″ cards. Computer– I use this for inspiration research such as scroll recipient’s interests on Facebook and original manuscript images. It saves time contacting friends for information and searching through university books.   Light Box— Mine is a Light Tracer Light Box II. I’ve had it for years. While it is slanted I have a large book under the back of it to slant it more. That makes for easier viewing and better ink flow. Pearl Ex Brilliant Gold pigment. I […]

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How-to Remove Scary From Writing SCA Documentation

In my previous article on arts and sciences documentation I responded to a common SCA non-writer’s lament. It presented several ways to show off creations without detailed writing. So what? What can you do if you want to write documentation? How do you learn to do it or improve at it? I won’t re-invent the wheel here. Instead, I give you resources to help you remove the scary from writing documentation. If you are very new to this try the first link. Others have sections on basic documentation that help as well. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ The SCA Arts and Sciences Easy Documentation-Writing Form on Ez-Doc–This Ez-Doc is form you edit with specific categories predetermined. You fill in sections relating to names (SCA and modern), project title, your inspiration (historical basis), tools and materials, procedure/methods, and sources. Entries Showing Documentation A & S Documentation Made Simple–A 2 page pdf about documentation steps. It’s presented in a form similar to many documentation entries I’ve judged. Examples included. Kingdom of Atlantia Arts and Sciences Handbook includes three brief sections on documentation. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ As I come from the Kingdom of Calontir, I include this link to their Arts and Sciences Criteria. Have a look at what judges expect to learn from you about your creation. Each category is broken into sections: novice, intermediate, and advanced. There is so much to be learned from writing about your project. It crystallizes your knowledge about your medieval creation. These links […]

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