Tips And Tricks To Making A Neat Scroll

I make them too. One distinguishing trait between a beginning scribe and an experienced one is their clean page. Experienced scribes have tricks they use to keep their scroll neat and clean as they work. Here I offer some to you in case you haven’t figured them out yourself.  Wash your hands before you begin working and omit hand lotion. Don’t have […]

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Tips To Drawing More Period People

The way Medieval faces, feet, and hands appear in manuscripts varies by era or location, often in the details. Some appear cartoonish others more realistic. What’s the best way for you to learn how to draw period-looking people?  Motifs I traced then transferred to M. Luciana’s Renaissance scroll. Most of us have been seeing since we were born but learning how to observe […]

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Secrets Of Artist Brush Repair

Have you ever had this happen, your favorite illumination brush is eaten by your dog? That’s what Pippa did recently.  All Fixed Well, she didn’t eat the whole brush. She chomped the handle into two pieces, just above the ferrule. That left me an unusable stubby brush. But, I was able to rescue it.  Using my electric rotary Dremel-type tool I drilled out […]

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The Useful Paint Niche

Recently at our scribal meeting, I was asked about how I use my gouache palette. Do I put out new paints for each painting session? Do I reconstitute the dried paint in its well? What do I do if the paint breaks into small bits? All great questions.  This is what I do. You may find other scribes work differently. […]

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Tip To Seeing Like An Artist

See the details? Have you been asking yourself when painting a preprint or charter why experienced scribes put the shadows where they do? Why the whitework goes where it does? Or how you transform what you see to the page? Here’s an idea for you to try. Before the huge number of illuminations on the internet, I would hunt down books that had enlarged the small pictures of illuminations. Today it’s easy to do the same thing yourself with online images.  Find a high-resolution digital illumination picture you like and zoom-in. Enlarge and expand them dramatically. Save them or print them out. Then take your time and study their strokes and details. Try to recreate them.  On Pinterest, I have a few boards that may help you with this.  Illumination: Drapery  Illumination: Shading Illumination: Strokes Illumination: Whitework I have confidence you’ll figure things out. The more illuminations you peruse and pore over the strokes the easier it becomes. It’s all about you recreating tiny details. Related Prior Post:   5 Tips To Train Your Artist Eye Related External Page:  Advanced Illumination by Mistress Nerissa de Saye 

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Tips For Using Sakura Micron Pens

Micron Pens. Check out the tiny tip of my biggest one. As you might have noticed, I use Sakura Micron pens on most award scrolls. They are a modern convenience that replaces a quill for outlining before and after painting.  These pens have waterproof, quick-drying archival pigment ink that does not feather or bleed through paper. When dry it is smear […]

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Outwitting Scribal Dirty Slips And Missteps

I’ve created many award scrolls over the years. Along the way, I messed up or dirtied my share. From them, I learned a few tricks. These may help you too. Neatness is a primary criterion for a quality scroll. I love working with pergamenata, but it doesn’t do well with oils. To help that you start with a simple prep. Go over the perg with a large non-latex white vinyl eraser. This removes oils and unwanted marks. You may also do this after the scroll is done and very dry. As I work I use a guard sheet under my working hand. This prevents adding hand-oil or marks. You could wear cotton gloves for this, but I find them cumbersome. They alter my sense of touch especially for fine paint strokes and lettering. I use an etch scratch nib in a holder to remove unwanted ink or paint marks. You might also use an Xacto knife for this. I prefer the curved scratch nib except when working between letter parts. Then I use the pointed nib. Luttrell Psalter Illumination Example Period effect. The more an award scroll looks like a period work the better. When I use modern gouache I select colors similar to those in my medieval inspirations. Some medieval manuscripts are known for their unique color palette such as the Luttrell Psalter. If your scroll emulates it your paint colors should also. You also want to apply them in a similar style.  Newer scribes […]

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Nurturing Your Scribal Visual Awareness

As an SCA scribe, I’m both scroll designer and producer. Without a knack for each and both together the scrolls I do fall short. Luminous scribal creations are best handled by frequent practice, exploration, and experiment. Each scroll is unique for the accumulated knowledge and skills expressed at the time you produce it. Your entire scribal experiences flow into each work you […]

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