How To Find The Source Of Undocumented Online Images

Unidentified Pinterest Image You know those lovely illuminations you find on Pinterest when you search for scroll inspiration. Your perfect source but it has no manuscript information. There’s a way to find the source using the image. It’s called a “reverse image search.” This technique is called “a reverse image search.” It analyzes the image contents itself comparing  its colors, shapes, and textures with a known sample. It does not use a picture’s associated keywords, tags, or descriptions.   This helps you because you don’t need search terms or keywords. It saves you guessing at words that may not be related or use people’s fuzzy labeling.  It helps you find images related to the sample or its popularity. It may also discover any altered or derivative works. To reverse image search using Google Chrome: find your chosen internet image  right click on it  click on “search Google for image” It’s simple, really. You can try it on the above Pinterest picture.  What did you find? When I did it Google found more than 5 sites to check plus several computer-designated similar images. One interesting enough to explore further. While not something you’ll use daily, it is another research skill for your tool-kit. A handy tool for those pesky undocumented manuscript images. Related Prior Post:   How To Google For Illuminated Manuscript Inspirations

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How To Search For Illuminated Manuscripts Without Getting What You Don’t Want

There’s something I neglected to include when I posted about searching the internet for illuminated manuscripts. I left out telling you how to exclude something you know you don’t want, like Pinterest or Wikipedia items. It’s simple. You can eliminate things from your search by putting a minus before the term of the things you don’t want. Any word you google immediately preceded by a “-” sign excludes those items from your search results.  Specifically, you type a space before the minus sign and none between the minus sign and your excluded things. When I search for illuminated manuscripts without “Pinterest” I enter illuminated manuscript -Pinterest.  If you tried that link you’ll find the results come up under Google’s option “All”. If you click on the “Images” header you get this. Or just start your search on Google’s “Images” page. You can also exclude multiple items, but each term must include a minus sign immediately before it. Try illuminated manuscript -Wikipedia -Pinterest. Or possibly this, illuminated manuscript -French -Pinterest. And don’t forget the space just before the -. Omitting Pinterest boards may be important to you because not all image collections are well verified. Some board owners are better researchers than others. It’s your choice, but using the – operator will reduce your search clutter. Related Prior Post:  How To Google For Illuminated Manuscript Inspirations

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How To Google For Illuminated Manuscript Inspirations

Calontir‘s current Monarchs, Logan and Ylva, are Norse-Viking and the scroll they want me to do is for a person with a 14th century Western European SCA persona. How do I blend those two? I started by asking Google. Trolling for manuscript images with Google is helpful if you know the way it searches. Its search results are based, in part, on a priority rank called a “PageRank”, a way Google measures a web page’s importance.  The first image(s), if any, are from the entered search term(s). After the most likely items, the search engine hunts for individual terms in your request. (This applies to text as well as images. Right now I’m looking for images.) For example, entering “14th century Norse illuminated manuscript” Google first provides images and the first two are Viking style boats in 14th-century manuscripts. Spot on for my search terms.  The next image Google provides is an English 14th-century illuminated manuscript. A ball-park result, 14th-century. But there’s a problem here. If the person asking for the search doesn’t know or doesn’t follow through with calling up the original image, it’s possible to misinterpret the results. A Viking boat image in a 14th-century manuscript fits, but a pretty, English manuscript that doesn’t have Edda prose or similar is unsuitable. The next image takes you to a list of 14th-century illuminated manuscripts at Wikipedia. Interesting to know what other manuscripts of the time look like, but less specific than my request. The last images […]

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