Quiz: Can You Match These 10 Illuminated Manuscripts With Their Names?

Can you match these 10 pictures of iconic illuminated manuscripts to their name?  You don’t have to have an Art History major to match these famous medieval illuminated manuscripts. They are some of the most well-known, especially among SCA scribes. From Kells to Crusades, these works are instantly recognizable. Can you match them all? To the left side are pictures from ten Western European illuminated manuscripts. To this post’s right are their unmatched names. All you have to do is match the proper name to its image.  Yes, I’m sneaky. I have not always used the most popular or well-known images. Also, there are more manuscript names than pictures. But all names are matchable because some manuscripts are known by more than one name. If you are curious, stumped, or in a hurry to find the answer click on the word “link” in the caption below the image. It will take you to a Wikipedia page about the manuscript. Have fun. Link The Hours of Catherine of Cleves Link The Book of Kells Link Hours of Gian Galeazzo Visconti Codex Aureus of Lorsch Link Maciejowski Bible Link St Alban’s Psalter The Luttrell Psalter Link Codex Manesse Link Tres Riches Heures du Duc de Berry Link Crusader Bible Link The Hunting Book of Gaston Phoebus Morgan Bible Link Related Prior Post: My 10 Favorite European Illuminated Manuscript Inspirations Related External Site: Art Miscellaneous Quizzes

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Acanthus Leaves

British Library Border Clipping Acanthus leaf from my handout “Acanthus Leaves: Drawing and Painting”  I love Acanthus leaves in art. They are an ornament that resembles leaves from the Mediterranean Acanthus plants. They have deeply cut leaves similar to thistles.  I like Acanthus leaves because they are a curvy, variable decoration I can use in most any art medium or era. In scribal illumination, Acanthus leaves add color, visual movement and design contrast to large text blocks. They also enhance large decorated display initials or a heraldic device.  There are several general Acanthus leaf styles from the broader leaf with ends that flip over to narrower forms without flips and in between. The Göttingen Model Book, a 15th-century workshop instruction manual, provides fascinating insight into how some period scribes drew and painted their leaves. British Library Harley 3490 f. 13v  You can create Acanthus leaves that are simple as in my above picture or add details such as dots along the vein and color modeling to enhance dimension.  Whatever you like. It’s a scroll ornament that lets you be creative. Related Prior Post: The Making of an SCA Scroll, Part 2 External Link: Acanthus Leaves: Drawing and Painting

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Period Pigments And Color Use

Cutting from Pope Innocent VIII’s service books.   I’ve run into the color use question again. You know, “What colors were used when and where?” My blog post today will be short, but the blog question’s answer could fill a book. Instead, I’ll give you a link to my 2013 class handout Period Pigments and Color Use. The lengthy handout is only a guide, a place to start. Today’s research into making the enlivening sumptuous manuscript colors divulges a diverse rainbow of hues derived from plants, minerals, and metals. I hope my guide encourages you to look deeper into the amazing colors displayed in illuminated manuscripts. External Link: Colour. The Art and Science of Illuminated Manuscripts

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How Well Do You Distinguish Colors?

I’ve been known to get into some vivid color discussions with artists. I seem to see colors more intensely or acutely than even my hairdresser. Perhaps I’m just more dogged about the concept. Even so, occasionally I’m out done.  Luttrell Psalter Heures du Duc de Berry Color determination, being able to see the difference between colors, is essential to an artist. As a scribe it is crucial to selecting colors that emulate your chosen inspiration source.  There’s a big difference in the colors in the Luttrell Psalter and those in Tres Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. As an art student or scribe, would this change your ability to learn about art? Would it affect how you paint? No matter your artistic style, would you change how you paint if you don’t see colors the same as those who view your work?  Knowing how you see color is a step to answering those questions. Below are BuzzFeed quizzes to help you casually assess where you fit on the color determination scale. These fun quizzes will give you a clue to the next step on your scribal journey. Are You Actually Color Blind What Colors Can You Actually See Can You Pass This Difficult Color Mixing Test This Trippy Pattern Quiz Will Determine How Well You See Color If you are interested to learn more, as part of their free online color theory classes, The Student Art Guide website tells how […]

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